The Azorean edible abalone Haliotis tuberculata, an alternative heavy metal-free marine resource?

  • Articles in SCI Journals
  • Jan, 2020

Torres, P., Rodrigues, A., Prestes, A.C.L., Neto, A.I., Álvaro, N. & Martins, G.M. (2020) The Azorean edible abalone Haliotis tuberculata, an alternative heavy metal-free marine resource?

Chemosphere, 242(125177), 1-9. DOI:10.1016/j.chemosphere.2019.125177 (IF2019 5,778; Q1 Environmental Sciences)
Summary:

Abalones are considered a delicacy and exploited for food worldwide. In many places, overfishing has led to the decimation of wild stocks and many are now reared in aquaculture systems. In the Azores, there is no tradition of eating abalones and Haliotis tuberculata stocks are still virtually untouched. However, as tourism in the islands grows and the stocks of other shellfish diminish, there is an increasing pressure to find alternative edible resources, leading to a rising interest in abalones. According to previous studies performed in the region, other edible species, including the local highly appreciated limpets and the giant barnacle, present high concentration levels of some heavy metals, which has been attributed to the volcanic origin of the islands. Here we analysed the metal content in the edible tissue of Haliotis tuberculata from São Miguel Island, Azores. The potential human health risks due to its consumption was assessed by estimating the average daily intake (EDI) and target hazard quotient (THQ) of metals. Similarly to other organisms in the Azores, abalones have higher than normal levels of some heavy metals, particularly cadmium, reflecting a local natural source that should be closely monitored from a public health point of view.


https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0045653519324166?viaihub

Team

  • The Azorean edible abalone Haliotis tuberculata, an alternative heavy metal-free marine resource? Afonso Costa Lucas Prestes Island Biodiversity, Biogeography & Conservation - IBBC
  • The Azorean edible abalone Haliotis tuberculata, an alternative heavy metal-free marine resource? Ana Isabel de Melo Azevedo Neto Island Biodiversity, Biogeography & Conservation - IBBC
  • The Azorean edible abalone Haliotis tuberculata, an alternative heavy metal-free marine resource? Gustavo Oliveira de Meneses Martins Island Biodiversity, Biogeography & Conservation - IBBC