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Dehydration rate determines the degree of membrane damage and desiccation tolerance in bryophytes

  • Articles in SCI Journals
  • Jan, 2017

Cruz de Carvalho, R., Catalá, M., Branquinho, C., Silva, J.M. & Barreno, E. (2017) Dehydration rate determines the degree of membrane damage and desiccation tolerance in bryophytes.

Physiologia Plantarum, 159(3), 277-289. DOI:10.1111/ppl.12511 (IF2016 3,330; Q1 Plant Sciences)
Summary:

Desiccation tolerant (DT) organisms are able to withstand an extended loss of body water and rapidly resume metabolism upon rehydration. This ability, however, is strongly dependent on a slow dehydration rate. Fast dehydration affects membrane integrity leading to intracellular solute leakage upon rehydration and thereby impairs metabolism recovery. We test the hypothesis that the increased cell membrane damage and membrane permeability observed under fast dehydration, compared with slow dehydration, is related to an increase in lipid peroxidation. Our results reject this hypothesis since following rehydration lipid peroxidation remains unaltered, a fact that could be due to the high increase of NO upon rehydration. However, in fast dried samples we found a strong signal of red autofluorescence upon rehydration, which correlates with an increase in ROS production and with membrane leakage, particularly the case of phenolics. This could be used as a bioindicator of oxidative stress and membrane damage.


http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ppl.12511/full