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A Global Island Monitoring Scheme (GIMS) for the long-term coordinated survey and monitoring of forest biota across islands

  • Articles in SCI Journals
  • Apr, 2018

Borges, P.A.V.Cardoso, P., Kreft, H., Whittaker, R.J., Fattorini, S., Emerson, B.C., Gil, A., Gillespie, R.G., Matthews, T.J., Santos, A.M.C., Steinbauer, M.J., Thébaud, C., Ah-Peng, C., Amorim, I.R., Aranda, S.C., Arroz, A.M., Azevedo, J.M., Boieiro, M., Borda-De-Água, L., Carvalho, J.C., Elias, R.B., Fernández-Palacios, J.M., Florencio, M., González-Mancebo, J.M., Heaney, L.R., Hortal, J., Kueffer, C., Lequette, B., Martín-Esquivel, J.L., López, H., Lamelas-López, L., Marcelino, J., Nunes, R., Oromí, P., Patiño, J., Pérez, A.J., Rego, C., Ribeiro, S.P., Rigal, F., Rodrigues, P., Rominger, A.J., Santos-Reis, M., Schaefer, H., Sérgio, C., Serrano, A.R.M., Sim-Sim, M., Stephenson, P.J., Soares, A.O., Strasberg, D., Vanderporten, A., Vieira, V. & Gabriel, R. (2018) A Global Island Monitoring Scheme (GIMS) for the long-term coordinated survey and monitoring of forest biota across islands.

Biodiversity and Conservation, Accepted, . DOI: (IF2016 2,265; Q1 Biodiversity Conservation)
Summary:

Islands harbour evolutionary and ecologically unique biota, which are currently disproportionately threatened by a multitude of anthropogenic factors, including habitat loss, invasive species and climate change. Native forests on oceanic islands are important refugia for endemic species, many of which are rare and highly threatened. Long-term monitoring schemes for those biota and ecosystems are urgently needed: (i) to provide quantitative baselines for detecting changes within island ecosystems, (ii) to evaluate the effectiveness of conservation and management actions, and (iii) to identify general ecological patterns and processes using multiple island systems as repeated ‘natural experiments’. In this contribution, we call for a Global Island Monitoring Scheme (GIMS) for monitoring the remaining native island forests, using bryophytes, vascular plants, selected groups of arthropods and vertebrates as model taxa. As a basis for the GIMS, we also present new, optimized monitoring protocols for bryophytes and arthropods that were developed based on former standardized inventory protocols. Effective inventorying and monitoring of native island forests will require: (i) permanent plots covering diverse ecological gradients (e.g. elevation, age of terrain, anthropogenic disturbance); (ii) a multiple-taxa approach that is based on standardized and replicable protocols; (iii) a common set of indicator taxa and community properties that are indicative of native island forests’ welfare, building on, and harmonized with existing sampling and monitoring efforts; (iv) capacity building and training of local researchers, collaboration and continuous dialogue with local stakeholders; and (v) long-term commitment by funding agencies to maintain a global network of native island forest monitoring plots.


Team